Vanessa Hurst

On writing, speaking, coding, and trying to change the world.

Honored to be among the Global Women Champions honored by Global Connections For Women (@@GC4Women) last night! 
(relevant notes: Many women there are learning to code, Paula Cole sang for us, & the cake was delicious) (at Harvard Club of New York City)

Honored to be among the Global Women Champions honored by Global Connections For Women (@@GC4Women) last night!
(relevant notes: Many women there are learning to code, Paula Cole sang for us, & the cake was delicious) (at Harvard Club of New York City)

codemontage:

Our CEO & Founder, Vanessa Hurst, was interviewed by Maria Shriver and profiled on the TODAY show for her work to make the world better through code. We’re so excited to be a part of encouraging more human-focused programmers and more women in technology!

changetheratio:

Look! TheLi.st Kindle Serial is out tomorrow! Featuring terrific essays from Sally Kohn, Nisha Chittal, Stacy London, Paula Froelich, Jenna Wortham, Ruth Ann Harnisch, Leslie Bradshaw, Cindy Gallop, Glynnis MacNicol & Rachel Sklar. You should probably pre-order it RIGHT NOW:
bit.ly/List10Habits
We love the cover and love the content even more. You can’t get more bang (or brains!) for your $1.99 (we promise a lot of both). 

changetheratio:

Look! TheLi.st Kindle Serial is out tomorrow! Featuring terrific essays from Sally Kohn, Nisha Chittal, Stacy London, Paula Froelich, Jenna Wortham, Ruth Ann Harnisch, Leslie Bradshaw, Cindy Gallop, Glynnis MacNicol & Rachel Sklar. You should probably pre-order it RIGHT NOW:

bit.ly/List10Habits

We love the cover and love the content even more. You can’t get more bang (or brains!) for your $1.99 (we promise a lot of both). 

24 Pull Requests

Minimalism

Minimalism;
a style characterized by extreme spareness

Minimalist;
a lover of sporks, reverse-bogo shopper, 2-in-1 lover, 2-for-1 hater

My minimalism isn’t truly a statement of style- it’s born of necessity, because I live in Manhattan. Most Manhattan apartments are not the gigantic sexy lofts you see on TV. They’re generous closets called apartments. When I first moved to the city, I brought only a quarter of my posessions. I’d find a way to bring the rest later, once I was settled. Five years later, my parents still give me regular reports on how my section of their basement fares. Don’t tell them, but that stuff is never going to make it in the big city.

This lack-of-space-turned-minimalism follows me everywhere. A major part of my goal at every cash register is to carefully time the refusal of a bag. I hope the cashier hears me and doesn’t forget (can’t refuse too early) and I hope the cashier reuses the bag intended for me (can’t refuse too late). It’s not rare for me to purchase shoes and leave the box, packaging, bag, and the shoes I came in wearing at the store. I’m sure some stores can’t figure out how to reuse the materials, but I feel better for having tried. I certainly am not keeping that box.

Ultimately, it’s an immense privilege to be a minimalist. I’m humbled when I step back and think about the root of this condition - I am so sure I can get access to an electronic book when I need it that I’m willing to give away paper books. I’m so sure I can find a new box to mail a gift to a friend that I’m willing to immediately recycle all packages I receive. I’m so sure I can afford new clothes next fall that I give or throw away the ones I didn’t like so much this fall. I’m so sure I can get food that I only have one cabinet of pantry storage in my kitchen. I’m so confident in my access to things that I don’t really value them. I’m a minimalist because I’m secure.

Who knew living in an oversized closet could be so meaningful?

Gratitude Month

November is one of my favorite months because everyone becomes obsessed with two of my longtime favorite things: food and gratitude. If it weren’t for the creepy mustaches of Movember, November might even triumph as the best month of the year.

'Stache dilemma aside, I try to express gratitude regularly for three main reasons:

  1. Acknowledgement - Life is beautiful and all of us, especially those who can read and freely share ideas through the internet, have a lot to be grateful for.
  2. Happiness - It makes us happy to acknowledge the people, places, and things that make our lives better, according to science.
  3. Future HappinessWhen we know what really makes us happy (aka what we’re grateful for), we can better prioritize our lives.

I have a few tricks for reminding myself to express gratitude, including a thrice daily gratitude journal prompt from grateful160 and browsing thank you cards on Paperless Post. What works for you? Do you think gratitude is important? I’d love to hear why or why not.

Thank you for reading! :)

"In 50 years we won’t use the term tech inclusion anymore, because it will be outdated. And we won’t be worried about basic coding skills because everyone, including women and underrepresented minorities, will have them. We’ll all be focused on those more important problems we need to solve and we’ll be using our tech skills to solve them."

Theresa Freet, CodeMontage Project Partnerships Manager

White House Tech Inclusion Champions of Change Summit, July 31, 2013

(via codemontage)